March 13,2018

Are you struggling to get your turf to that lavishly flush lawn that you just want to run barefoot through? Fret no more because we are here for you. Your lawn is a unique extension of your home. To truly cultivate the lawn, each and every lawn requires an individually catered plan that provides it with unique attention. The biggest mistake that people make is thinking all grass is the same.  

The grass showdown WARM VS COOL

Grass is separated into classes. Warm Season grasses and Cool Season grasses. I know what you are thinking here. How does my lawn know the season when in just one week you can experience all four seasons? You’re in luck our agents at the customer center of excellence went on quest to provide this for you.

Warm season grasses ultimately grow best when the temperature is in the 80 – 95 °F range. In Georgia grasses will continue to have dynamic growth during these temperatures no matter the season. Once the cooler temperature hits this warm grass goes into extended dormant phase. During this extended hibernation your turf is that glorious Georgia brown that we all so cherish.  To avoid a Brown Georgia Christmas, we recommended overseeing with ryegrass to give with a nice crisp winter green look. These grasses love their sun and can struggle in extremely shaded areas.

Common Types of Warm Season Grass

  • Common Bermuda
  • Hybrid Bermuda
  • Centipede
  • Augustine
  • Zoysia

Cool Season grass begins to grow when your turf is in the 60 – 70°F range. In Georgia these grasses can have an up-hill battle on there hands due to the damage it takes from the sun. During summer months these require significantly more water than the warm season grasses. These grasses do very well with lawns that have a natural shade that provides a shield that protects them from the Georgia heat. 

Common Types of Cool Season Grass

  • Tall Fescue
  • Fine Fescue
  • Rye Grass
  • Kentucky Blue Grass

How do I treat my Turf?

Below are some best practices that will help tailor a program that best works for your turf.

Bermuda (Common & Hybrid)

This is the most commonly used type of grass in Georgia. There are many hybrid versions of Bermuda. Bermuda not only adapted to the Georgia climate but thrived in it.  Bermuda grows at a rapid rate and requires the least amount of water. Bermuda can be invasive to an area you don’t want your yard to expand too. Establishing defined bed lines and spraying in the beds will stop the invasion of your flower bed. 

Mowing

Best cutting heights range from 1/2 to 1 1/2 inches.

Watering

When a yard with Bermuda grass is needs water, its blades will bow down. Bermuda grass needs 1 to 1.25 inches of water on a weekly basis.

Bermuda lawns are to be aerated early in the summer.

Fertilization

Do not fertilize Bermuda grass unless the lawn has been overseeded.

Aeration and Overseeding 

Aeration and Overseeding should be completed early summer when the grass is growing rapidly.

 

Centipede

Centipede grass is known for its excellent heat tolerance and extremely low maintenance requirements. A favorite of lawn owners interested in minimal upkeep, Centipede grass requires far less attention and input than other grasses in its growing region. However, Centipede has very specific climate and soil requirements that limit its use in the United States, primarily in the Southeast. If you reside in that region, this low maintenance grass may be a top lawn choice for you.

Mowing  

We recommend mowing at 1 ½ – 2 inches 

Watering

Water four to eight inches deep at the time to establish a deeper root system because centipede is not as drought tolerant

Fertilization

Low to medium if at all with nitrogen and potassium and no phosphorus as this depletes the iron levels; a good application would be 15-0-15.   16-4-8 is also a recommended fertilizer for Centipede.

Aeration and Overseeding

The best time to aerate centipede grass is in early summer, when the grass is growing rapidly. On very compacted soils, aerating twice a year would not be out of the question. Apply fertilizer and water after aerating so the turf recovers rapidly.

 

St. Augustine

This is the most commonly used type of grass in Georgia. There are many hybrid versions of Bermuda. Bermuda not only adapted to the Georgia climate but thrived in it.  Bermuda grows at a rapid rate and requires the least amount of water. Bermuda can be invasive to an area you don’t want your yard to expand too. Establishing defined bed lines and spraying in the beds will stop the invasion of your flower bed.

Mowing

Recommended at mowing at 3-4 inches.

Water

When the grass begins to turn a bluish green color, it is time to water deeply again. Do not water at night but in the morning. You want to water deeply giving 3 or 5 inches.

Fertilization

St Augustine grass requires approximately 4 to 5 lbs nitrogen per 1000 sq. ft. per year. If the grass is being started with plug or with stolons, apply 1 lb nitrogen per 1000 sq. ft. each month during the growing season. This will promote the fastest growth and spread. Established grass only needs 4 to 5 lbs per year. Over-fertilization of mature turf only encourages thatch, insect and disease problems.

Aeration and Overseeding

The best time to aerate St. Augustine grass is in early summer, when the grass is growing rapidly. On very compacted soils, aerating twice a year would not be out of the question. Apply fertilizer and water after aerating so the turf recovers rapidly.

 

Zoysia

Zoysia grass is known for its ability to stand up to heat, drought, heavy foot traffic and a variety of other challenges. In its optimal growing zones, this tough grass can deliver a beautiful, dense lawn with very little input from you. Whether Zoysia is right for you depends on where you live, your lawn care goals, and how you use your lawn. When those elements align with Zoysia’s strengths, this versatile lawn grass may be the ideal choice.

Mowing

Best mowing height is 1 1/2″ to 3″.

Watering

Zoysia only needs about an ½ to 1 inch of water per week.

Fertilization  

Nutri-20, which has been specifically formulated for Zoysia grass plugs. 

Aeration and Overseeding

Wait for at least a year to aerate newly planted lawns, so that grass is well established. Aerate when soil is moist, but not saturated. The tines of a lawn aerator penetrate moist soil more deeply; soil that’s too wet clogs tines. To achieve the correct moisture balance, your lawn should absorb 1 inch of water – delivered through rainfall or irrigation – prior to aerating. This may mean you’ll water for one hour one day prior to aerating or, if your soil is hard, for shorter times on several days prior to aerating. Avoid aerating during drought or high heat. If you aerate in these conditions, you’ll stress the lawn by allowing heat to dry soil.

 

Fescue (Tall & Fine)

Tall fescue is valued for its adaptability to a wide range of climates and its tolerances for cold, heat, drought and shade. In its preferred growing zones, tall fescue provides lawn owners with outstanding options for improving lawn resilience and durability. Depending on where you live and your lawn goals, this versatile grass may be an excellent choice for you.

Mowing

Mow your Fescue at a height between 1.5 to 3 inches.

Watering

Fescue requires at least an inch of water, even through the winter, and two inches in the summer per week. If you notice the blades of grass remain flattened from foot traffic, it’s time to water.

Fertilization

Do not fertilize Fescue in the summer. Apply fertilizers in the spring and fall.

Aeration and Overseeding

Since Fescue can take a beating from the brutal Atlanta summers, it’s a good idea to aerate and overseed each fall to fill in the bare spots.

 

Rye Grass

Perennial ryegrass is widely used throughout the United States, but the way it’s used differs from region to region. This hard-working grass is valued for its fast germination rate and quick establishment, which makes it a valuable component in permanent and temporary lawns. Under proper growing conditions in suitable regions, perennial ryegrass forms a lush, fine-bladed lawn that maintains its color into winter. Depending on where you live and your immediate lawn goals, perennial ryegrass may offer just what you need.

Mowing

We recommend mowing at 1 ½ – 2 Feet

Watering

Water the lawn two to three times each day to start germination. A light watering each time is all you need.

Fertilization

We Recommend pure nitrogen fertilizer Distribute your ryegrass seeds one month before the first frost is expected. Suggested application, according to Clemson University, is 10 pounds of annual ryegrass seed per 1,000 square feet of lawn.

Aeration and Overseeding

Most experts recommend that you do NOT overseed your centipede lawn with a winter ryegrass.  It can result in killing your lawn due to the added stress of early spring competition. 

 

Kentucky Blue Grass

For many lawn owners in the United States, Kentucky bluegrass is synonymous with the ideal lawn. When given its preferred growing conditions and proper care, this grass produces a dense, lush, durable lawn that lives up to its reputation. However, Kentucky bluegrass doesn’t do it on its own. This grass requires a relatively high level of maintenance to look its best, but results can be worth it. Depending on your grass growing region and your lawn care goals, Kentucky bluegrass may be a perfect choice for you.

Mowing

We recommend mowing at 3-4 Inches

Watering

Kentucky bluegrass should receive at least 1/2 inch with each watering each week.

Fertilization

The amount of fertilizer is stated in pounds of Nitrogen per 1000 sq. ft. per year. Kentucky bluegrass requires 4-5 lbs of nitrogen per 1000 sq. ft. per year.

Aeration and Overseeding

The best time for aeration is during the growing season, when the grass can heal and fill in any open areas after soil plugs are removed. Ideally, aerate the lawn with cool season grass in the early spring or fall and those with warm season grass in the late spring.

 

As you can see there is a lot that goes into just putting together the plan to cultivate your turf. Let us help you get that curb shine every time.  Contact your Lawn.com today and we will help tailor a program just for you!


Topics: Created,Equal,Grass,Turf